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 INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson

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Jarrett
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PostSubject: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Thu Aug 04, 2011 9:52 pm

The following is an official and authentic interview with former WWE Tough Enough participant and runner up Luke Robinson, This interview is exclusive to The Universe @ http:///www.theuniverse.forumotion.co.uk/. Under no circumstances may any part of this interview be reproduced or retransmitted in any form without the prior consent from a Universe administrator. All rights reserved.
________________________________________________________________________


First and foremost, I'd like to thank you on behalf of everyone on our site for doing the interview with us. I'm going to go in order from the start of your career to the present and at the end we have some user submitted questions for you. First off, when did you first get into wrestling and what interested you about it?

I had watched wrestling as a little kid and had a Macho Man Wrestling Buddy (and that awesome WrestleMania Arcade game for Super Nintendo) but by middle school I was one of those jerks who "didn't get it" anymore. I made fun of my friend who was obsessed with wrestling with all the stereotypical insults. Then one day I was walking down the hall to my room and heard the TV in my brother's room. It was Monday Night Raw in the midst of a Rock/Mankind promo. I watched the segment and suddenly everything clicked. Sports entertainment is about storytelling just like a good country song. It evokes an emotion or a memory from your life. In the Rock/Mankind feud it was a relatable story. The privileged, flashy, bully type against the lovable loser. Despite my current "look," I grew up on a farm by the river in Maine - a blue collar country boy. I always remembered the "rich kids" getting new Nikes almost every week and being condescending and elitist about it. So I instantly gravitated towards the Mankind character. Hoping each week that he'd pop that bully in the face and get his revenge. That's when I fell in love with professional wrestling.

I have read that in your younger years you had somewhat of your own "wrestling shows" with your friends. How did this come about?

My buddy and I came home from school one day and his dad had a new carpentry belt laying on the counter. It wasn't one of those old suede looking ones with the pockets. It was a new style one made of a mesh fabric with a velcro overlay strap and was shaped strikingly similar to a wrestling belt. So we cut out an oval faceplate from an old trapper keeper and hot glued it to the belt. We used mail box letters to spell "Hard Core Championship" on it and decorated it with band aids and the like. We used those WWE action figure bases to make the side plates on each side. Our work was complete, but we decided we needed to have a match for it. So we laid out matresses in the basement and had our 1st championship match. Each week more and more of our friends got involved until we had entrance music, strobe lights, storylines, the whole works. We kept it going all the way through high school. For the rest of my friends it was something fun to do on the weekends, for me, it was the beginning of a career path.

Years back you began your professional training where you met WWE Hall of Famer Tony Atlas at a gym he trained at. How did you get started on that training?

When I first met Tony he dismissed me as just another kid who wanted to be a pro wrestler and kinda shrugged me off. But I persisted and insisted that he watch some of my basement wrestling matches. Looking back this seems totally hilarious, but he obliged because the gym owner was related to my aunt and kindly asked Tony to give me a chance. After watching one of our matches, he said "Kid, you got da moves but ya got ta learn da psychology." So we went back to the basement that night and filmed a very old school style match, went back to the gym the next day, showed Tony, he approved, and told us to meet him at his next show. That year, we helped set up and break down the ring every show and also helped acquire sponsorships for the program and local TV. In exchange, Tony let us have ring time. I'll never forget my first bump in a real ring. I took a stalling vertical suplex from my friend Casey. We had done this move plenty of times on mattresses but when I took my first bump I thought "Damn that hurt. Is this really what I want to do for a living?" Well, I'm a little bit loco, so my answer was a resounding "yes." The following year Tony opened a wrestling school. I trained with Tony 5 days a week for 2-3 hours a session all summer long. Halfway through the summer I had impressed Tony so much that I was given a key to the gym and allowed to train as much as I wanted even after class and on the weekends.

What was it like having Tony Atlas as your trainer? Were there pros and cons?

Tony Atlas is a brilliant wrestling trainer. Each day started with a healthy diet of calisthenic exercises. Often we'd do a deck of card workout. Red cards were number of hindu pushups (face cards are 10, aces are 20) and black cards were number of hindu squats. Then we'd do about 20 minutes of amateur wrestling drills like sitouts and neck bridges along with some actual amateur wrestling matches so we got a feel for shoot wrestling. Only after this regimen was complete each day were we allowed to step foot in the ring. Tony's training focused heavily on what he called "walking the line." Walking the line between old school and new school, between fantasy and reality. I learned a style that is similar to a HHH [Triple H], HBK [Shawn Michaels], Y2J [Chris Jericho] mix. Some old school psychology with the right amount of holds mixed with some exciting high spots and modern style moves.

Tying it in here, you've been trained by Tony Atlas and Bill Demott respectively. What were the two of them like and how did they differ (or relate)?

Bill and Tony are both very demanding trainers. They both want you to respect the honor and privilege of stepping foot in that ring by earning it through hard physical work. In other words, both put you through the paces physically each day to earn your right to walk through those ropes. They want to find out who's willing to put up with all the physical labor and toll it takes on the boy and still be willing to press on. This weeds out the people only want the glory but aren't willing to pour their heart, soul, blood, sweat, and tears into this business. In regards to their differences, Bill is much more of a repitition drill sergeant type trainer in the ring. We do a lot of reps and blow up drills (drills designed to make you perform even when you're dead tired). Once we moved onto in-ring training Tony was a bit more methodical. We'd practice different scenarios, film it, and if something went wrong, we'd go back and watch the footage and talk about it, and then go back later and try to correct it. In that sense, Tony was a bit more understanding and willing to help you grow in a positive environment. Bill conversely, likes to speak in riddles and let you figure it out on your own even if you keep making the same mistake all day. Both have their merits. Tony is underrated for his mind. He really does have a brilliant wrestling mind and understands today's game. Bill is underrated for his technical prowess. He is an amazing mat technician and knows every pressure point and control point in regards to chain and mat wrestling. Ultimately, it was a life changing experience working with both guys.

By 2006, you were working for the National Wrestling Alliance, commonly abbreviated to the NWA. How did you become contracted under them and what was your time there like?

Tony had recommended me to the booker there because they were running a weekly show very close to the University of Maine campus. Tony knew I needed to get regular work in the ring to improve and helped me get my foot in the door there. Running a weekly show that continues to draw is a rare thing on the independent scene. But we kept consistent crowds for 2 years. It was an amazing experience because you really get to develop relationships with the crowd as you and your character grow. I also got experience in the creative marketing side of the business as we had t-shirts and gimmick booths and even did appearances at local businesses before big shows. My time here really expedited by experience level and helped shape the rest of my career.

Later on in 2006, you won your first championship, defeating Sonny Roselli for the North Atlantic Heavyweight Championship. What was that first title win like?

Winning a championship here meant a lot in regards to how the fans and my peers viewed me because I was never meant to get that push. I was curtain jerking most shows and putting in the match of the night week in and week out. Due to the fan reaction, they realized they had to put me in higher profile matches. So the true reward of winning a championship is what it means in terms of being successful entertainer and knowing your hard work, creativity, and presentation connected with the audience.

Obviously you joined thirteen others on WWE Tough Enough in 2011. How did you get onto the show?

Funny story. I got a call one night from a California number and the voice on the other line said, "Hi this is Chris from Shed Media; we're casting for WWE's Tough Enough." Well, I thought I was being pranked so I hung up on him. 2 weeks later I checked the WWE's press release online and saw Shed Media named as the casting company for the show. I immediately called the number back and apologized. It turns out, the WWE had given my name to Shed as someone they were interested in from 1 of the tryouts I had done. He e-mailed me the submission form but I still wasn't convinced. I had a personal talk with Mr. [Tony] Atlas and voiced my concerns. I didn't know if I wanted to be on Tough Enough and let people into my "behind the scenes" life because I thought it might ruin the mystique of being a superstar. I know from watching past seasons that I couldn't buy Maven as a real superstar after seeing him be a normal dude in training. Then it hit me. I'm NOT a normal dude even in my real life. My real personality is larger than life and what better place to showcase it than every Monday night before Raw. Tony told me I had to do it because "Boy, ya nevah know if anotha door will open." I had to send in a 7 minute video of my personality which centered around my passion for life, my ability to have fun in almost every situation, and my attitude of living everyday for the best story. I also focused on the fact that I'm a country boy who looks like a Hollywood movie star and said "just because you're uglier than me, doesn't mean you're tougher than me." After a series of written and verbal interviews, they flew 28 of us to LA for casting finals. A week long process of blood, piss, and psych tests followed by a panel interview in front of network and WWE execs. I told them "I'm a superstar because when I look in magazines and watch TV, I don't wish I was any of those people. I look in the mirror and love being me." That hooked them and the rest is history.

You stood out throughout the competition and eventually finished in second place. Who else did you see potential in?

Of course my boy Jeremiah [Riggs]. He has the build and the charisma and quick learning ability to be a big name. I love his carefree "mess with me and see what happens" attitude. In a time where a lot of people are afraid to take risks, Jeremiah goes for it regardless of what standard convention says he's supposed to do or say. We share this attitude and that's why we got along so well.

Looking back on the entire competition, what were the ups and downs of it?

The trust test of Tough Enough wasn't the physical part; it's the mental part. You never know when you're going to be able to sleep, when you'll be woken up, when you need to be at training, when you'll be shuttled off in a van. You're in a constant state of anxiousness with no time to ever let your mind shut off. That being said, there is a HUGE upside that outweighs any of that. First of all, the ability to work with and interact with people who helped shape who you are as a person. Sports entertainment and Stone Cold [Steve Austin] are a big part of who I am as a person. Imaginative, hard working, spontaneous, impulsive. These traits all developed as a result of my love for pro wrestling. Secondly, the opportunities it has opened both in the wrestling world and other entertainment avenues is boundless and a true gift. I was getting more TV time than a lot of guys on the Raw and SmackDown rosters were each week. A spot guys would kill for. And finally and most importantly, for better or worse, our culture places a premium on people who have been on TV. I truly value the opportunity to make someone's day with a handshake or an autograph. To see a child light up and get excited just to meet you is a true honor and a gift. I've been all over the country from Las Vegas [Nevada], Los Angeles [California], Dallas [Texas], New York, Atlanta [Georgia], Tampa [Florida]; and people come up to me excited to meet me and excited about the show. That means the world. Nothing angers me more when a celebrity or athlete gets angry about fans approaching them. It's what we signed up for when we decided we wanted to be entertainers. I'd rather be bothered all through lunch or dinner by fans than have them not care at all.

On Monday Night Raw, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin had the difficult task of picking between you and Andy Leavine. I'm not positive if you were aware of the result before you came to the ring or if that is something you want to discuss, but what was it like to hear Steve's decision? What kinds of thoughts were flowing through your mind then?

The decision was kept completely under wraps. We found out the moment Stone Cold uttered that name just like everyone else. Hearing Steve [Austin] say "Big Andy" [winner Andy Leavine] was like taking a "Hulk Hand" punch to the gut. A vast spectrum of emotions and thoughts were flowing through my head. I was honored and felt so lucky just to be a part of this life changing experience. On the other hand, I was angry and resentful. I had just spent the past 4 months of my life dedicated to this one goal. I spent 2 months before the show undergoing a rigorous workout program designed to prepare me for the phsycial challenges of the show and it clearly reflected in how many skills challenges I won or was in the top 3 of. I had watched the season unfold where I was showcased every episode as the most entertaining person on the show. In every category I had a clear knockout advantage. So I felt a bit like I had just had a big loogie hocked in my face. But ultimately, I was a professional. Shook Andy's hand and gave Steve a hug. He had tought me a lot and been a phenomenal to me throughout the entire process. He told me he was proud of me and that I could still be a big star in this business.

And now I have several questions from our site's users for you to answer, first being do you see yourself with a WWE contract sometime soon?

I'm a perpetual optimist. I know my value and worth to the entertainment world and I'm still working as hard as I can towards that goal.

The users never fail to expect a TNA reference, so what do you think of that company and is it something you'd like to be a part of?

I don't watch TNA. They have some amazing talent, but I've always considered myself a WWE guy. But in this business you never say never. If the opportunity presented itself and it felt right then it's something I'd consider. I simply want a forum to unleash Luke Robinson to the world and set it on fire.

Next, who are (or were) your biggest inspirations growing up, both in the ring and out of it?

My mom and my dad are amazing people. They're divorced but still good friends. My dad is a Maine hick who works for the water district and my mom is a lab tech at a dental office. My dad comes home from work and cuts wood all summer, getting ready for the wood stove in the winter. My mom is the fashionable one. She likes expensive dinners and vacations but also has shot a deer and worked on the farm when my parents were together. That's what inspired me to be who I am today. A perfect mix of blue collar work ethic combined with an appreciation for culture. In almost every aspect of my life I have this duality because of them. I'm athletic, but did very well in school. I'm smart, but I'm also fun to party with. I can fit in with the jock crowd or the band geeks. I'm cool but also a big geek (I love Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter).
In the ring, my inspiration were guys like The Rock, Mick Foley, HHH, HBK, and Chris Jericho. Guys that were great in the ring and also great entertainers. Guys who made me FEEL and remember moments. They worked hard to make every aspect of what they do an experience.


Fourth, do you have any kind of hostile feelings against winner Andy Leavine?

I don't have hostile feelings for Andy winning. That wasn't his decision. My life has been, is, and will be amazing. I'm a very happy and lucky guy. I'm proud of the way I handled myself in the competition. I was honest, hard working, and didn't need to berate anyone to put myself over.

And one more interesting one. Aside from yourself or Andy, who in the competition would you say deserved a top two spot?

Martin [Casaus] was very talented in the ring, but physically wasn't "tough enough"/in shape enough to withstand the rigors of the competition. Once again, I have to say that Jeremiah was the only one who I could look in the eye and see as my equal.

And to wrap things up with a bang, I'd like to give you a "free mic," is there something you'd like to say to Andy Leavine? Or anybody else for that matter?

I don't have anything to say directly to Andy, but a few general thoughts and logic points I want everyone to consider. One, take away any air time that Andy got that included him talking about needing this to support his family, not being able to do something because his wife said so, or talking about someone else in his family being a hard worker and what would you be left with? I take pride in the fact that I didn't need to point out that my dad actual does dig ditches for the water district because what does that have to do with MY toughness. I take pride in the fact that I didn't have to use any pity story to get myself over. I do this because I LOVE to ENTERTAIN you fans, not because I'm desperate for a job and failed at my dream of being a pro football player like Andy did. Two, he acts like he's this bad ass country boy. He lives in an apartment complex in Tampa. I live on a farm overlooking the river in a little camp in Maine thats filled with deer heads, moose antlers, and bear rugs. Driftwood bonfires at night, catching cat fish to cook over the fire. But just because I'm not a big ugly goof I'm somehow not as tough as him? I ACTUALLY LIVE IT. I don't just have to act tough because I'm ugly and it's the only card I can play. Three, then for him to say he's the only real athlete on Tough Enough after there is 10 weeks of video evidence proving otherwise was absurd and made him sound stupid. 10 weeks of me smoking everyone physically, yet he's the real athlete? Does not compute. Then in one of the vignettes all the trainers at FCW say "He was the guy you wanted to see win 'cause he has a family and kids." In other words ADMITTING that they think he should've won because they pity his situation! I've said it before and I'll say it again, am I supposed to apologize for knowing how to use condoms and not having kids in my early 20s? You know why I'm single and have been so cautious about not having kids? Because I've known since I was 15 that this is what I've wanted to do for a living. So I made sure I did EVERYTHING to support that cause. I got a college degree, I stayed single, I don't have kids. Because I know this business demands a ton of a travel and a gypsy soul. I want to be a machine for this business and I know any ties will prevent me from doing everything I want to do. Did they ever consider those sacrifices and decisions that I made? I'm proud of who I am and the decisions I've made in my life. I'm strong, compassionate, spontaneous, generous, loving, hard working, and I have a passion and zest for life that is unmatched. I love who I am and no one will stop me from being happy. Remember folks, it's okay to love yourself. To believe in yourself. To have unbridled confidence. Because if you don't believe in yourself how can anyone else? I stopped looking at the situation as "what's wrong with me, why didn't the WWE pick me?" Instead I ask, "what's wrong with them?" That's when you keep getting up and persevere the hardest. So one day you can look back and go "See? This what you missed out on."

Thanks again for taking the time to do this! If you'd like you can leave your Facebook or Twitter account links so the fans can like and follow you. Thanks again!

My official Twitter page is @LukeRobinson13 Like my fanpage on Facebook for all booking and appearance updates! http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Luke-Robinson/156826367725086

Universe Twitter: @UniverseForum
Web: http://www.theuniverse.forumotion.co.uk/

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ECCW: Extreme Created Championship Wrestling
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fuck
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Thu Aug 04, 2011 10:31 pm

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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:06 am



I enjoyed it
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Mesa
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:10 am

Very nice read. Made me sad he doesn't watch TNA though. Sad
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:14 am

The Cymbal [Team Granger] wrote:
Very nice read. Made me sad he doesn't watch TNA though. Sad
How about this time you contact all of the wrestling sites?

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Mesa
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:36 am

Jarrett wrote:
The Cymbal [Team Granger] wrote:
Very nice read. Made me sad he doesn't watch TNA though. Sad
How about this time you contact all of the wrestling sites?

?
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:04 am

The Cymbal [Team Granger] wrote:
Jarrett wrote:
The Cymbal [Team Granger] wrote:
Very nice read. Made me sad he doesn't watch TNA though. Sad
How about this time you contact all of the wrestling sites?

?
You know, Lords of Pain, WrestleZone, etc. I did it last time.

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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:48 am

That condom part was righteous
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He Looks Hispaninc to me!
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 10:29 am

Reading this just adds to the thought I have had since Tough Enough and that is that Luke should have won.
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:16 pm

Shame my ROH question didn't got through, but with what he said about TNA and how he's a WWE guy through and true, he probably would have given the same answer to them as well.

Regardless, brilliant read. I'll see if I can get this over to SEScoops.com, unless they already got it in which case, my job is done. :p
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:50 pm

Rhawk wrote:
Shame my ROH question didn't got through, but with what he said about TNA and how he's a WWE guy through and true, he probably would have given the same answer to them as well.

Regardless, brilliant read. I'll see if I can get this over to SEScoops.com, unless they already got it in which case, my job is done. :p
You may have been one of the ones who posted there's just a bit too late.

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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:20 pm

UPDATE: Tough Enough winner Andy Leavine has commented on The Universe's interview with Luke Robinson with a simple "Who cares?"

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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Fri Aug 05, 2011 1:26 pm

Obviosuly he cared enough to comment about it. :p
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Mesa
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Sat Aug 06, 2011 12:13 pm

Fine, I'll get on it.
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:18 am

Just read it lol. Was a quality read
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:39 am

That last paragraph...holy shit!
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PostSubject: Re: INTERVIEW: WWE Tough Enough's Luke Robinson   Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:40 am

ikr lol
Epic
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